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500 Best Genealogy and Family History Tips

500 Best Genealogy and Family History Tips

Ref: UTP0425

'500 Best Genealogy and Family History Tips' could be be described as a 'brain dump' of me, Thomas MacEntee, and my many years of knowledge about genealogy and family history.

Basically what I've done is to extract my favourite tips and tricks from over 85 presentations, 10 books and numerous articles. In addition, I've reviewed the social media posts and conversations from Facebook, Twitter and other platforms to highlight those issues most important to today's genealogists.

What will you find in this 'best tips' guide? Everything from practical ways to use Google, advice on protecting your privacy online, information about secret or little known resources for genealogy research and more. The best way to use this guide is to browse the table of contents to find a topic of interest. Also simply search the book when trying to find a solution to a problem, such as how to cite a source or locate an app to generate bibliographic information.

'500 Best Genealogy and Family History Tips' covers a wide range of topics including:
- genealogy research methodology and strategy
- how to use websites such as Google and Internet Archive to find your ancestors
- realising the power of Facebook, Evernote and Pinterest for genealogy
- preservng family photos and stories
- staying safe using social media
- how to secure your genealogy data on your computer in the cloud
- and more!!

Contents:
Genealogy rules to live by
Books
Data backups
Dropbox
Education
Evernote
Facebook
Frugal genealogy - FREE stuff!
Getting organised and information overload
Google
Mapping your genealogy
Photos
Pinning your family history
Playing nice in the genealogy sandbox
Potpourri - what they never tell you about genealogy
Preserving family history
Research logs and methodology
Self-publishing
Social media
Staying safe online
Tech grab bag
Travel tips
Time to go pro?
Starting a genealogy business
Giving back
The future of genealogy

Pages: 72

Comment by My History; this book is by an American author and there are inevitably a few references that pertain mainly to the North American continent. However the book is quite international with many of its tips and is no less useful to readers from other parts of the World especially where references are made to the many internet services that cross international boundaries.

Price:9.00







Customer Reviews

    For an amateur genealogist, any tips are welcome to research further.  (17/03/2017) Miss J M Holmes -


British and Irish Newspapers

British and Irish Newspapers

Ref: UTP0285

Records of births, marriages and deaths provide a fantastic starting point for identifying our ancestors names and where they lived, but in terms of trying to understand how those ancestors once lived, there is no better resource to plunder than a good newspaper. Over the last two centuries in particular newspapers have recorded the events that have shaped our forebears’ lives, and in many cases noted anecdotes, notices and advertisements directly concerning them and their local communities.

In this latest Unlock the Past guide, family historian Chris Paton reviews the availability of newspapers from across the British Isles, describing how to find those that have been digitised and made available online, and explaining how to locate considerably more that have not within the various libraries and archives across Britain and Ireland

Pages: 56

Price:7.00




A Decade of Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-23

A Decade of Centenaries: Researching Ireland 1912-23

Ref: UTP0288

As the issue of Home Rule reared its head for a third time, its supporters and detractors raised militias to defend their positions, whilst women fought for the vote and labourers fought for better terms from their employers. The First World War would soon dramatically change everything, leading some to see England's difficulty as Ireland's opportunity. When an independent republic was proclaimed through force of arms at Easter 1916, the response would see a brutal guerilla war fought between the British forces the Irish republicans, a partitioned island, and a nation divided.

A century on, in this book from Unlock the Past, Northern Irish born family historian Chris Paton will help you to discover whether your ancestors were caught up in the events of that period - whether they were Suffragettes, unionised workers, Ulster or Irish Volunteers, fighting with the British Army and Crown forces, against them as rebels and revolutionaries, and in the ensuing civil war on both sides of the Treaty divide. With improved cataloguing by archives, and better access to the records, both online and offline, a new gateway has been opened into one of the island's most tumultuous, tragic, exciting, and utterly desperate periods of the 20th century. In this book he will show you how to step through it.

Contents:
Introduction
Acknowledgements
1. The genealogical landscape
- Vital records
- Burials
- Censuses
- Probate
- Newspapers
- National archives and libraries
- Family and local history societies
2. Home Rule
- Ireland in the Union
- The Ulster Covenant
- Ulster and Irish Volunteers
- Researching the Volunteers
3. Women's suffrage
- Demand for the vote
- The campaign escalates
- Suffragette sources
4. Workers' rights
- Background
- The Dublin Lockout
- Researching the Lockout
- Other disputes
5. The First World War
- Military records
6. The Easter Rising
- The Rebellion
- The particiapnts
- Researching the Rising
7. Towards independence
- Conscription and election
- The War of Inependence
- The Treaty
- The Irish Civil War
- Northern Ireland
- Legacy
- Researching 1919-1923
Further reading
Index

60 Pages

Price:7.50




People who bought this also bought:

Irish Family History Resources Online 2nd Edition
Arrivals in Australia from 1788

Arrivals in Australia from 1788

Ref: UTP0292

This book introduces the history and records of migration to Australia from 1788.
Migrating to a new country was one of the most dramatic life changes anyone undertook and it certainly affected the lives of their descendants. Investigating their journey is a key part of your family history research.
However immigration records in Australia are not all held in one place - when, where and how they arrived affect where (and whether) records of their arrival can be found. Understanding categories of arrivals and the immigration schemes in place as well as the general principles of where documents are held, will give you confidence that you have looked in all the right places.

Contents:
Preface

Abbreviations
Introduction
1. Discovering a migrant ancestor
2. Convicts
3. Crew
4. Military
5. New South Wales
6. Van Diemen's Land / Tasmania
7. Victoria
8. Queensland
9. South Australia
10. Northern Territory
11. Western Australia
12. Commonwealth of Australia
Glossary
Appendix 1. Immigrant's Guide (1853)
Appendix 2. The Passengers Act 1855
Appendix 3. Websites for further reading
Appendix 4. Books for further reading
Index

Pages: 140

Price:16.00







Customer Reviews

    interesting reading, good value  (10/09/2017) Brian Gilpin -


Buried Treasure: What's in the English Parish Chest

Buried Treasure: What's in the English Parish Chest

Ref: UTP0562

'Buried Treasure: What's in the English Parish Chest' examines all the records created by parish officials for the civil and religious administrations of the English parish, except the baptism, marriage and burial records described so well in the companion volume - Discover English Parish Registers.

Records surviving in the parish chest will often solve your brick wall problems, including: 'Where did my ancestor come from before here?' or "Who is the father of that illegitimate child?" In this detailed guide, family historian Paul Milner explains how and why the records were created, how changing laws affected who was and was not included, what the records look like and what information they contain. After showing examples of numerous records, the guide explains how and where to access the records (online, microfilm, originals or in print).

Here is a practical guide that will help family researchers solve their problems, and put them into historical context. This small volume is full of material for both the beginner and the experienced researcher. It is a well-illustrated guide to the contents of the English parish chest that allows any researcher to go way beyond the baptism, marriage and burial registers commonly used for parish research.

Contents:
Acknowledgements
Introduction and to use this book
Settlement and removal records
- Laws regarding settlement
- Methods of obtaining settlement
- Settlement records
- Settlement certificates
- Settlement examination
- Removal order
- Payment order
- Appeals in Quarter Sessions
Bastardy records
- Laws governing bastardy
- Bastardy records created
- Complaint of arrears
Apprenticeship records
Vestry minutes
Churchwarden accounts
- Church rates/Poor rates
- Churchwarden expenses
- List of jurors
- Voter lists
Constable accounts
- Laws relating to the role of constable
- Constables' accounts and records
Militia records
Miscellaneous items
- Confirmation list
- Church restoration list of donors
Finding the parish chest records
- Access to published records
- Free websites
- Commercial websites
Things to remember when using parish chest records
Bibliography
Index

Pages: 60

Price:8.00







Customer Reviews

    Lots of ideas for further research that i didnt know about on the parish chests  (17/03/2017) Miss J M Holmes -


    Excellent booklet covering the different types of parish records. I particularly like the author's approach of including the various laws which led to different parish records being required - invaluable for determining which particular records you might find for a specific generation of ancestors  (23/02/2017) MRS W L FOWLER -


Citing Historical Sources: A Manual for Family Historians

Citing Historical Sources: A Manual for Family Historians

Ref: UTP0322

'Citing Historical Sources: A Manual for Family Historians' aims to answer the question "how do I reference the diverse range of source material encountered by the family historian?" The question has become even more complex in recent years with the increasing use of the internet and the plethora of new online sources now added to the mix. The construction of the text for a family history does require that you acknowledge your sources, adhere to copyright legislation and take note of ethical issues in your publication.
This book uses a straighforward and practical format to take you through the rules and conventions of referencing and acknowledgement of the resources used in your research to provide an easy and sensible entry into this important historical task.
'Citing Historical Sources: A Manual for Family Historians' discusses plagarism, digital resources, social media, Trove, oral sources, copyright, photographs, the protection of ideas, ethics, permission and release forms, and all aspects of footnotes, endnotes and the bibliography. The book has ample notes on how you can use online resources and print media to help with your referencing and there are numerous footnotes, endnotes, in-text references, capitalisation, the citing of images and more.

Contents:
Introduction and acknowledgements
Citing sources
- Consistency of the citation
- Ensuring there is sufficient information
- Acknowledging prior work
- Accuracy
- Capitalisation
- Hyphenation or not?
- Footnotes
- Endotes
- Textual references or in-text references
Incorporation previous histories
- Plagarism
- Verbatim quotes - not too many, not too long
- Paraphrasing
References
- Books, chapters in books
- Ebooks, chapters in ebooks - Journal, magazine and newspaper articles, pamphlets
- Ejournals, emagazines, online articles
- Government publications
- Manuscripts, family papers
- Other items from newspapers
- Ibid., op. cit., short forms
- Oral history, intereviews, recordings
- URLs (Universal Resource Locators)
- Social media - YouTube, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, blogs, podcasts
- Letters, emails
- Online indexes, digitised records
- Citing images, diagrams, maps, photographs
- Trove
Constructing a bibliography
- Bibliography
- Books, chapters in books
- Journal, magazines, pamphlets, online documents, online indexes
- Family papers, manuscripts, oral records, letters, emails
- Government publications, newspapers
- Oral interviews
Creating Copyright
- Stretching the truth
- Controversial subject matter
- Defamation and libel
- Codes of ethics
Exercise is athics
Permission notes and publication release
- Simple release form
- Useful websites
Further reading and references
- Free online manuals of style asnd advice
- Books

Pages: 40

Price:5.75




Cracking the Code of Old Handwriting

Cracking the Code of Old Handwriting

Ref: UTP0243

Sooner or later, family historians will come across a major obstacle in progressing their research - old handwriting can be difficult to resolve and this booklet is designed to overcome some of these problems.
The problem rests on the fact that most of us unknowingly read by identifying whole words by their shape rather than looking at individual letters. When we come across unfamiliar writing, we are forced to look at the individual letters in their context. The unexpected shapes of old letters and a multitude of shortcuts in writing results in considerable difficulties for modern readers, and this booklet provides some strategies to overcome this problem.
There are a number of books on this subject, but, apart from the practical advice within, a strength of this publication lies in the number of actual examples to help the researcher identify seemingly meaningless words.
Early parish registers often have some level of Latin in their content. This book contains a useful dictionary of the more common words that may be encountered in parish registers containing Latin.

Contents:
Introduction
The issues behind the problems
Understanding old handwriting
How to tackle the problem
Roundhand
A modern problem or two
Common letter forms of the 17th to 19th century
Some problem letters in Secretary Hand
Common ligatures in Secretary Hand
Suspensions and ligatures associated with q
Relationships that may differ from today's meanings
19th Century Copperplate style
Round hand example transcriptions
Chancery hand example with transcription
Coo Latin words encountered in texts

Pages: 32

Price:5.50







Customer Reviews

    really useful, fairly easy to understand  (10/09/2017) Brian Gilpin -


Death Certificates & Archaic Medical Terms

Death Certificates & Archaic Medical Terms

Ref: UTP0181

Death certificates are an important document in family research both to ‘kill off’ our ancestors and to determine their cause of death. This is especially so for people who are interested in establishing their medical genealogy. However at times it seems as though the cause of death is in a foreign language.

Death certificates and archaic medical terms examines the history and evolution of death certificates. When did they start? What is on them? What were the legal requirements? What does it mean when a death is certified? Why aren’t all deaths certified?

It also gives meanings to a number of archaic terms found on death certificates such as cachexia, breakbone fever, byssinosis, coeliac passion, dipsomania, inanition and Potter’s Rot.

Pages: 64

Price:5.00







Customer Reviews

    Useful aid. Helpful when expanding your notes  (10/09/2017) Brian Gilpin -


Discover English Census Records

Discover English Census Records

Ref: UTP0563

English census records are a fundamental source for English research, because it is the only source that clearly identifies all the members of a family unit in one records and puts them all together in the one place at one time.
In this detailed guide, family historian Paul Milner explains how and why census records were created in 1801, expanding to an every-name format in 1841, and following every 10 years since. The book explains what the records look like, how they have evolved, and why they are one of the few records that place individuals into families. By following a case study family through the different census years, Milner expands upon census records to show how to put the family physically on the ground, using maps.
Census research methods have changed drastically in the last few years, as nationwide indexes have come online, other with attached images. This book also shows how to effectively use these different online databases and indexes.
Here is a practical guide that not only will help the beginner avoid mistakes in climbing the family tree, but also provides depth and details to assist the experience researcher.

Contents:
Acknowledgements
Introduction and how to use this book
Context
- Defining a population census
- 1801 through 1831 censuses
- 1841 and later censuses
1841 census
- Column headings
- Understanding the information provided
- 1841 census example
- Citing your census image
1851-1901 censuses
- Understanding the information provided
- 1851 census
- 1861 census
- 1871 census
- 1881 census
- 1891 census
- 1901 census
- Citing your census image
1911 census
- Understanding the information provided
- 1911 census example
- Citing your census image
Accessing the census returns
Online indexes with images
- Ancesty
- Findmypast
- S&N Genealogy
- Genes Reunited
- 1901 Census Online
- 1911 Census
- UK Census Online
Online Indexes
- FamilySearch
- FreeCEN
- GENUKI
- Census Finder
Published on CD-ROM indexes
- Daniel Morgan
- FamilySearch
- FamilySearch Wiki
- GENfair
- Parish Chest
- GENUKI
- Society of Genealogists
- S&N Genealogy
Special census situations
- Soldiers in the army
- Royal Navy sailors
- Merchant Navy sailors and fishermen
- Night workers
- Institutions
Putting your ancestor on the ground
- How to get the descriptive page on Ancestry
- Using maps
Histpop - online historical reports website
- Browse options
- Search option
Why can't I find my ancestor?
- Indexing problems
- Naming problems
- Location problems
- Missing census returns
The future - what is coming?
- 1921 census
- Later census returns
- 1939 National Registration Act (2 & 3 Geo. 6)
Ten things to remember when using the census return
Bibliography
Index

Pages: 56

Price:7.00







Customer Reviews

    A book giving all the details of each census and more, very useful for the amateur genealogist  (17/03/2017) Miss J M Holmes -


    Very good informative booklet.  (23/11/2016) M J WELLS -


Discover English Parish Registers

Discover English Parish Registers

Ref: UTP0561

English parish records are a fundamental source for English research. In this detailed guide, family historian Paul Milner explains how and why the records were created, beginning in 1538, what the records look like and what information they contain. A well-illustrated case study, with plenty of twists and turns, shows why care is needed to trace back in time from one generation to the next. The guide continues by explaining how and where to get access the records, (online, microfilm, originals or in print) and concludes by explaining what to do when you can’t find your ancestors in the records.

Here is a practical guide that will help the beginner to avoid mistakes in climbing the family tree, yet the depth and details are here to assist the experienced researcher in understanding how to get the most from parish registers. This publication is a definitive guide to English parish registers that you will wish you had when you first started your research.

Pages: 52

Price:7.00







Customer Reviews

    Very good informative booklet.  (23/11/2016) M J WELLS -


Discover Irish Land Records

Discover Irish Land Records

Ref: UTP0287

The questions that drive us with family history research in Ireland are no different to those asked anywhere else in the world. We need to find the records that tell us who our ancestors were, when and where they lived, and how they related to others. In Ireland, however, many of the records necessary for the task have sadly been lost across time, of were woefully restrictive in how they were created in the first place.
Whilst some of the basic vital records do not survive, however, there are plenty of others that will compensate, in this guide book, Northern Ireland born family historian Chris Paton takes a look at the potential to be found within Irish land records.
Amongst documents of ownership and tenancy, valuation and tithes records, documents for inheritance, censuses, and many other resources, there are ancestral stories lying dormant and waiting to be found. In this guide, he demonstrates how to find them.
Contents:
Introduction
- Acknowledgements
Chapter 1. A troubled history
- Gaels, Vikings and Old English
- The Plantation of Ulster
- Wars of the Three Kingdoms
- Rebellion, union and rebellion
- Land reform
- The partitioned island
Chapter 2. Boundaries and administration
- Provinces and counties
- Baronies and civil parishes
- Religious parishes and dioceses
- Townlands
- Manors and demenses
- Boroughs
- Poor Law Unions and DEDs
- Registration districts
- Measurements
Chapter 3. Where were they?
- Vital records
- Decennial census records (1901-1911)
- Decennial census records (1821-1851)
- Earlier censuses
- Directories
- Electoral records
- Newspapers
Chapter 4. Tenancy, ownership and valuation
- Estate records
- Leases
- Rental records
- Quit rents and ground rents
- Estate maps
- Probate records
- Land registration
- The Down Survey of Ireland
- Tithe records
- Valuation records
Chapter 5. A sense of place
- Irish Historic Towns Atlas
- Ordnance Survey maps
- Ordnance Survey Memoirs
- Gazetteers, journals and parish histories
Useful addresses
Further reading
Index

Pages: 60

Please note there is a larger print version of this book available as the print for this book is small for some readers.

Price:7.50




Discover Irish Land Records - Larger Print Version

Discover Irish Land Records - Larger Print Version

Ref: UTP0287L

Large print version
The questions that drive us with family history research in Ireland are no different to those asked anywhere else in the world. We need to find the records that tell us who our ancestors were, when and where they lived, and how they related to others. In Ireland, however, many of the records necessary for the task have sadly been lost across time, of were woefully restrictive in how they were created in the first place.
Whilst some of the basic vital records do not survive, however, there are plenty of others that will compensate, in this guide book, Northern Ireland born family historian Chris Paton takes a look at the potential to be found within Irish land records.
Amongst documents of ownership and tenancy, valuation and tithes records, documents for inheritance, censuses, and many other resources, there are ancestral stories lying dormant and waiting to be found. In this guide, he demonstrates how to find them.
Contents:
Introduction
- Acknowledgements
Chapter 1. A troubled history
- Gaels, Vikings and Old English
- The Plantation of Ulster
- Wars of the Three Kingdoms
- Rebellion, union and rebellion
- Land reform
- The partitioned island
Chapter 2. Boundaries and administration
- Provinces and counties
- Baronies and civil parishes
- Religious parishes and dioceses
- Townlands
- Manors and demenses
- Boroughs
- Poor Law Unions and DEDs
- Registration districts
- Measurements
Chapter 3. Where were they?
- Vital records
- Decennial census records (1901-1911)
- Decennial census records (1821-1851)
- Earlier censuses
- Directories
- Electoral records
- Newspapers
Chapter 4. Tenancy, ownership and valuation
- Estate records
- Leases
- Rental records
- Quit rents and ground rents
- Estate maps
- Probate records
- Land registration
- The Down Survey of Ireland
- Tithe records
- Valuation records
Chapter 5. A sense of place
- Irish Historic Towns Atlas
- Ordnance Survey maps
- Ordnance Survey Memoirs
- Gazetteers, journals and parish histories
Useful addresses
Further reading
Index

Pages: 60

Price:12.00




Discover Scottish Church Records 2nd Ed.

Ref: UTP0281A



In this greatly expanded second edition of Chris Paton's popular title, he explores the history and records of the various churches in Scotland prior to 1855, the year in which civil registration commenced within the country. He describes the theological changes imposed by the Reformation of 1560, the nature of the state's battles with the Kirk, and the Kirk's subsequent battles within itself. Most importantly, he also discusses the nature of the records generated by the various Scottish churches, how to interpret them, and above all else, how to find them.

Whether you are looking for tales of ministers carried into the air by Scotland's fairy folk, the fire and thunder of John Knox, a detailed explanation of the online offerings of the ScotlandsPeople website, or the treasures waiting in the National Records of Scotland, this is the definitive research guide to help anyone with Caledonian connections.

Contents:
Introduction
Second edition
Acknowledgements
1. The Godly Commonwealth
- The Reformation
- The Stuarts
- Secessions and dissenters
- The Disruption
- Multi-faith Scotland
2. Church of Scotland Research
- The Vital Records (OPRs)
- Baptisms
- Marriage
- Burials
- Accessing the BMD records
3. Church governance
- Kirk Session records
- Establishing what exists
- Presbytery, Synod and General Assembly
- Heritors
- Estate papers
4. Nonconformist Presbyterian Churches
- Looking for clues
- Finding nonconformist records
- Locating the right church
- Switching churches
- Catalogues
5. Other church denominations
- The Scottish Episcopal Church
- Roman Catholicism
- Quakers
- Methodists
- Salvation Army
- Congregationalists
- Evangelical Union
- Baptists
- Catholic Apostolic Church (Irvingites)
- Moravians
- Bereans
- Universalists
- Unitarians
- Swedenborgians
- Mormons
- Jews
- Muslims
- Sikhs
6. Working for the Church
- Church of Scotland ministers
- Other ministers
- Newspapers
- School teachers
Appendix 1. Basic research strategy
Appendix 2. Further reading
Index

92 Pages

Price:11.00




Discover Scottish Civil Registration Records

Discover Scottish Civil Registration Records

Ref: UTP0284

This latest guide from family historian Chris Paton takes a look at the vast world of Scottish civil registration records. Scotland commenced the statutory registration of births, marriages and deaths within the country in 1855, some seventeen and half years after a similar process had already got underway in England and Wales. The information lost to the family historian by such a late start is, however, more than made up for by the fact that Scottish registration records are the most detailed of all those found within the British Isles.

But what was the law behind Scottish registration, and how did it differ to England, Wales and Ireland? Who was legally obliged to do what and when, what were the penalties for default, and how might such knowledge help with our ancestral research? Why were all the forms of Scottish irregular marriage not abolished in 1939, and what angered the country’s doctors? Where are the records not found online via ScotlandsPeople, such as those for adoption, vaccination, civil partnerships and divorce—and what vital records does the General Register Office in England hold for Scots as far back as the 1760s, and far beyond Britain’s shores?

Pages: 52

Price:7.00




Discover Scottish Land Records

Discover Scottish Land Records

Ref: UTP0283

This latest guide from family historian Chris Paton takes a look at the complicated records concerning land and property based research in Scotland. For centuries property transactions within the country were governed by feudal tenure, a system which was abandoned in England and Wales in the Middle Ages but which continued in Scotland until 2004. But feudalism was not the only method by which land was held, with udalism, dùthchas, leasehold and more competing as forms of tenure across the country at different times.

Connected with the rules surrounding property transactions were those associated with the inheritance of land and heritable estate, all of which are explained in great detail. From sasines to skat, from retours to precepts of clare constant, and from apparent heirs to heirs apparent, this concise guide will help you to get to grips with one of the most exciting and useful topics within Scottish family history.

Pages: 68

Price:8.00




DNA for Genealogists 3nd Edition

DNA for Genealogists 3nd Edition

Ref: UTP0291

As well as providing information about ourselves, DNA testing allows us to find others who share our ancestors, and also to confirm or challenge apparently known relationships. Such tests can provide evidence of relationship even when no documents exist. Previously available only to medical and law-enforcement professionals, commercial testing companies now make genetic testing directly available to anyone who is interested.

DNA testing will not replace the more familiar genealogical research techniques of gathering oral and documentary evidence and compiling family trees. Instead it offers entirely new research tools more information to augment the documents and oral histories as well as a way of testing family trees, to see if conclusions drawn are confirmed by this new evidence. This book shows how you can use DNA to harness this exciting new range of genealogical research tools.

The amount of scientific jargon associated with genetics can be intimidating. This publication provides a contextual understanding of DNA suitable for genealogists and discusses the currently available tests that are likely to be of interest to family historians, especially those wanting to prove (or disprove) compiled family trees, to connect ‘new’ relatives by means of inherited genetic material and to draw conclusions about where we fit into the greater human family.

Pages: 52

Price:7.00




Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis

Down and Out in Scotland: Researching Ancestral Crisis

Ref: UTP0286

It is perhaps one of greatest truisms of family history research that we will often find that the lives of our ancestors were best documented when the chips were truly down.

There were many battles that our forebears fought for and against in Scotland, both on a personal level and a part of the society within which they lived. There were the laws of the local parish church and the punishments awaiting those who breached kirk discipline; the struggles to avoid poverty and the stigma of being a debtor; the darkest moments of the soul, from mental health issues and illness, to murder and suicide; and the dramatic moments of rebellion, when our forebears drew a line in the sand against a perceived tyranny or democratic deficit. Illness, death, bigamy, abandonment, accidents, eviction, ethnic cleansing - a dramatic range of challenges across a lifetime, and at times, outright tragedy. And close to each of them, a quill and ink.

But through all of these episodes, there is an even greater story that emerges, of how our ancestors overcame such struggles. In this Unlock the Past guide, genealogist Chris Paton goes in search of the records of ancestral hardship in Scotland, to allow us to truly understand the situations that our ancestors had to endure and overcome across the generations, to hep us become the very people who we are today.

Contents:

Acknowlegements
1. Family events and relationships
- Illegitimacy
- Foundlings, orphans and adoption
- Marriage, bigamy and divorce
- Homosexuality
- Death
2. Law and order
- The Kirk
- The Crown
- Franchise and burgh courts
- Criminal prosecution
- Murder
- Additional courts
- Police and prison records
- Transportation
- Execution
3. Poverty
- The Old Poor Law
- The New Poor Law
- The records
4. Debt
- Put to the horn
- Debts upon inheritance
- Cessio bonorum and sesquestration
5. Medical problems
- Hospital records
- Asylums
- Suicide
- Accidents
6. Them and us
- The Covenanters and the Killing Time
- The Jacobite rebellions
- The expulsion of the Gael
- The vote
Further reading
Index

Pages: 56

Price:7.00




Evernote for Family Historians

Evernote for Family Historians

Ref: UTP0163

Family historians have more need than most people to be organised. We have a lot of electronic and paper files in different places in different formats.

Evernote can collect everything together, all in one place:
- digitised images and digital photographs
- scanned documents
- research notes and database printouts
- PDFs and ebooks
- web pages and links emails
- voice recordings and family videos

We can organise all of this treasure, access it quickly and easily, and synchronise it between our computers, phones and tablets. We can search across and withing files. Awe can share with others and collaborate on projects.

Evernote can change the way we go about our research an can educe the need for printing and hardcopy storage.

We can also use Evernote to organise other areas of our lives - writing, travelling, shopping, finances, technology - the possibilities are limitless.

Evernote can change your life, and this book will show you how.

Contents:
Preface
Introduction
What is Evernote?
Getting started
- Sign up
- Account settings
- Cost
- Setting up Notebooks
- Creating tags
- Display
- Apps for your phone or tablet
- Web Clipper
Creating
- Create a new note
- Email
- Apps for your phone or tablet
- Web Slipper
- Scan your paper documents
Organising
- Notebooks
- Notes
- Tags
- Organise your tags
- Sync
- Archiving
Searching
- Searching tips
- Search terms
- Saved searches
Sharing
- Email
- By public URL
- Chat
Family history
- Research resources
- Lecture notes
- Checklists
- Writing
- Blogging
- Projects
Not just family history
Security
- Can I delete my account?
Addresses
Index

Pages: 44

Price:7.00




Family History on the Cheap

Family History on the Cheap

Ref: UTP0003

Genealogy is one of Australia’s leading hobbies but it can be expensive and time consuming looking for family history information. With the growth of the internet and more information online it is, however, becoming easier and quicker if you know where to look.
'Family History on the Cheap' examines a broad range of topics including family sources, whether someone has already researched the family, when to use professional researchers, how to obtain discounts, what sites are free, how to plan and organize your research and how to maximise research results from your trips to archives and libraries.
Finding births, marriages and deaths are the cornerstones of family history research and this publication looks at various ways of discovering this information in a wide variety of sources such as wills and probate records, cemetery records, newspapers and so on without spending money.

'Family History on the Cheap' highlights numerous tips and tricks for how to get the most from research trips to archives, libraries , family history and local historical societies, visits to relatives, social networking sites, commercial websites and of course, Google. You will quickly recoup its purchase price many times over with the money and time savings outlined throughout the book.
Being an Australian published book, many of the examples and places mentioned throughout the book are Australian related, but the concepts apply to those researching anywhere worldwide.

Contents:
Preface
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations
Introduction
Brief Introduction to Family History
Relative Savings – Tap into Family Knowledge
Has it Been done Before?
Stay Organised and on Top of the Paperwork
Technology Savings on Communications
Certificates – Don’t Pay Full Price
Utilise the Benefits and Services of Genealogy and Family History Societies
Libraries and Archives – It’s All Free to Look
Family History Centres
Travel for Maximum Benefit, Least Cost
Professional Researchers – When to Use
Internet – Vast Opportunities
Some More Favourite Sites
Serendipity – the Art of Finding Elusive Ancestors
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index

Pages: 72

Price:7.00




Google: The Genealogists Friend

Google: The Genealogists Friend

Ref: UTP0182

by Helen Smith

Everyone knows Google as the most used search engine in the world, but for genealogists it can do so much more to further their family history research.

Finding an image of the ship on which your ancestor went to war, using Street view to walk the streets of your ancestral area, translating that document, finding that distant cousin who has the photos of family bible, mapping their migration path - these are just some of the ways you can use Google in your family history.


Pages: 52

Price:7.00




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How to Write Your Family History: A Guide to Creating, Planning, Edting & Publishing Family Stories

How to Write Your Family History: A Guide to Creating, Planning, Edting & Publishing Family Stories

Ref: UTP0324

At some time as you tread the seductive, wonderful pathway of completing more and more research, you might just want to lift your head from this pile of collected data and think about how, where and in what way your will write and publish the family history.
Noeline outlines strategies to get you to the desk and writing. The book will show you how to identify and choose a format for writing family stories, to understand and apply strategies to plan and create your characters, to construct chapters and apply the basics of writing/rewriting, editing, planning and publishing to produce and professional, valuable and very readable family history.
Contents:
Introduction
Barriers to getting started
Collect until you drop syndrome
Family history is not 'everything' that happened in the past
Questions to find dates - Where, who, how?
- Where do you begin?
- Who are you writing for?
- How will you write?
Creative chronology
Planning - where do you want to go with this story and how to plan it?
Setting limits
Interpretation
Imagination
A hook to hang your story on
How do you choose your hook?
A favourite character
Publishing
- Paper publishing
- Electronic publishing
- Software
Editing
- Get some to read and edit your writing
- Checking facts
- Repetition and consistency
Good historical manners
- Plagiarism
- Copyright
- Legal deposit
- International Book Standard Number (ISBN)
- Cataloguing-in-Publication (CIP)
- Privacy/permissions/ethics
Getting your book oout to readers - marketing and promotion
- Book launch
- Dostribution
Writing exercises
- Write about your research/writing journey
- Exercising the imagination
Style sheet
Useful websites for writing, editing and publishing tips
- Writing
- Editing
- Publishing
Further reading
Index

Pages: 32

Price:6.00




Harnessing the Facebook Generation

Harnessing the Facebook Generation

Ref: UTP0263

Despite its title, this book is not about how to set up a Facebook page, how to Tweet, or how to create a website. Instead, it is about ensuring a future for our research. It is about why we should be concerned about doing this and how we can go about making sure that our family’s history is not only preserved but enhanced when we are no longer able to be its custodian. It is also about presenting our hobby in a way that is attractive to all age groups. This is a book for grown-ups who want to inspire their descendants and other young people, with a love of history and heritage. It is a thought-provoking look at how we can encourage the next generation of family historians and why we might want to do so. Suggestions cover activities, outings, toys, games, books and ways of exploiting the internet in order to motivate and enthuse young people, even toddlers.Unlike many researchers, Janet Few was a young family historian herself once, drawing up her first family tree at the age of seven. She is passionate about passing on her love of family and local history to young people. Having spent part of her working life as a history teacher, in a setting where all technology was banned, she had to devise inventive ways of making lessons lively, interactive and appealing. As an historical interpreter and manager of Swords and Spindles https://swordsandspindles.wordpress.com, Janet now works to promote a love of history in hormonal teenagers, sharing with them aspects of life in the seventeenth century. Janet has run family and local history sessions for school children and is dedicated to encouraging young people to engage with their history and heritage.

Author: Janet Few

Pages: 48

Price:6.75




Irish Family History Resources Online 2nd Edition

Irish Family History Resources Online 2nd Edition

Ref: UTP0282

There is a popular belief that Irish family history research is virtually impossible because ‘all the records were burned in the civil war’. But as Northern Irish born family historian Chris Paton demonstrates, the glass is most definitely half full rather than half empty when it comes to research in the Emerald Isle. Many records still exist which can help with your ancestral pursuits, and for those unable to make their way to Ireland to carry out research, the internet is finally coming to the rescue, as more and more material is increasingly finding its way online by the day.

This concise Unlock the Past guide explores the key repositories and records now available online, and will prove to you that if you have been put off with Irish research in the past, now is absolutely the time to take another look.

Contents:
Introduction
Second edition
Acknowledgements
Who were they?
- Civil registration
- The GRO Ireland indexes
- Church records
- Burial records
- Wills and probate
- Biographical databases
- Heraldry
Where were they?
- Censuses
- Street directories
- Land records
- Maps and gazetteers
Archives and Libraries
- PRONI
- National Archives of Ireland
- National Library of Ireland
- RASCAL and IAR
Newspapers and Books
- Newspapers
- Books, journals and magazines
Other useful material
- Gateway sites
- Military, police and the law
- Emigration
- Miscellaneous sites of interest
- Magazines
Some further reading
Index

64 pages

Price:9.00




Locating Your German Ancestor's Place of Origin

Locating Your German Ancestor's Place of Origin

Ref: UTP0201

Emigration from Germany to the Australian and New Zealand colonies went through a number of cycles. There were times when there was a strong demand for workers in the colonies when any willing worker could find employment, but these were all too soon followed by times of oversupply when the newly arrived immigrants struggled to find a position. In Germany too, there were factors that affected immigration.
Due to the large number of people emigrating from Germany, many of the current generation are now seeking to find out more about their German heritage.
A primary goal when researching people from Germany is to locate the places from which they originated. This is important because specific locations are needed in order to proceed further: to obtain civil or church records of births or baptisms, marriages, and deaths or burials, for example.
Unlike the Australian, New Zealand or British situation where births, deaths and marriages were recorded centrally, in Germany they were recorded and stored locally at the local Standesamt (civil registry office).
This book guides you through finding various records which will help in locating your ancestor's place of origin.

Contents:
Introduction
Birth, death and marriage certificates
Emigration records
- Hamburg Auswandererlisten (Emigrant lists)
- Württemberg Emigration Index
- Baden Emigration Emigration Index
- Danish Emigration Database
- Swiss Overseas Emigration 1910-1953
Immigration records
Naturalisation records
Other records
- Obituaries
- Biographies
- Cemetery records
- Family bible
Resolving difficulties
Gazetteers
- Meyers Orts- und Verkekrs-lexicon des Deutschen Reichs
- Gemeinde Lexikon für das Königreich Preußen
- Gemeinde Lexicon für den Freistaat Preussen
- Deutsches Ortsvuerzeichnis
- Kartenmeister
- ProGenealogists
- GOV - Das genealogische Ortsverzeichnis
Maps
Bibliography
Index

Pages: 52

Price:7.00




London & Middlesex Family History Resources Online

London & Middlesex Family History Resources Online

Ref: UTP0541

London is often called a country in itself. In 1901, as many people lived in the UK’s capital city (4.5 million in the Administrative County of London) as in either Scotland or Ireland. The even larger Metropolitan Police District contained two million more (as many as the population of Wales). This concise guide explains what is meant by ‘London’ at different times, from its origins in the Roman Empire 2000 years ago, through the growth of the ‘City’ until Greater London’s almost complete absorption of the county of Middlesex in the 20th century.

Most of the main London records are online, and this guide covers Internet access to civil registration (of births, marriages and deaths) from 1837, the 1841–1911 census returns, and parish registers (of baptisms, marriages and burials) from 1538. In addition, it looks at websites for non-conformist registers, gravestone inscriptions, armed forces’ records, wills (explaining the complex organisation of church courts), criminal records, newspapers, local histories, directories and gazetteers. London’s family history societies and the city’s major archives are also covered, as are many London-specific websites.

Pages: 64

Price:8.00







Customer Reviews

    OK. A little thin, but full of facts.  (08/02/2017) Ian Fraser -


Opening the Doors to Family Tree Maker: Or How to Enter Your Information Correctly

Opening the Doors to Family Tree Maker: Or How to Enter Your Information Correctly

Ref: UTP0372

Family Tree Maker, usually called FTM, is Australia's largest selling genealogy program. It has enjoyed huge success and is now in its 22nd iteration as FTM 2014 for Windows, and Family Tree Maker 3 for Mac. Both versions run on the same database and the files are interchangable.
For everyone who is just starting out with Family Tree Maker with FTM 2012, FTM 2014 or FTM for Mac 3, this is a useful book for you! It takes users through the various data entry 'doors' in Family Tree Maker encouraging them to focus on correct data entry so that the program can deliver the best outcome and output to the user.

Contents:
Foreword
Introduction
Opening the doors into Family Tree Maker
1. Door number one: the Name door
2. Door number two: the Date door
3. Door number three: the Place door
4. Door number four: the Sources door
5. Door number five: the Media door
6. Door number six: the Notes door
Index

Pages: 76

Price:12.50




Preserving Your Family's Oral History and Stories

Preserving Your Family's Oral History and Stories

Ref: UTP0423

Many of us got our start in tracing and preserving our family history based on a story, perhaps one you heard as a child. Do you remember how engaging that story was? Was it the story itself or how the storyteller presented the information? Whatever the reasons, the story had an impact and if not preserved on paper or in an audio recording, that story is somehow preserved in your mind.
Fast forward to the 21st century and it seems that 'what's old is new again' with storytelling one of the hot buzz words. The fact is that oral history and storytelling involves family, and ancestry has been around ever since humans walked the earth. Before writing forms existed and even as recently as the early 20th century with a lack of vital records, family history was preserved as oral history.
'Preserving Your Family's Oral History and Stories' provides you with all the information on the latest methods and tools used to capture and preserve those family stories. In addition, once you've learned how easy it is to build a family archive of stories, you'll want to share them with others using the tips and tricks provided in this book.
Contents:
What is 'oral history' and why is it important to families?
Getting started: a checklist for family oral history preservation
- Communication and scheduling
- Recording devices and platforms
- Interview questions and prompts
- Sharing questions and prompts
- Follow up materials
A review of oral history recording tools
- Audio
- Video
- Writing
- Other
Interviewing family members
- Tips and tricks for interviewing family members
- Interview ideas from an expert: Kim Weitkamp
- Sample interview questions
Organising and producing your family's story
- Take inventory of your content
- Create a project and task list
- Modularise the story via story boarding
- Use a timeline
- Keeping things organised and accessible
Incorporating existing content
- Converting old home movies, audio recordings, slides and video
- Photos and images can tell stories too!
- Add in the uncommon and unexpected
- Remember to use platforms that offer options
Modern methods for oral history preservation and sharing
- Digital storytelling platforms (Saving Memories Forever, Treelines)
- Blogs and websites (Blogger, WordPress, Weebly)
- Self-Published books (Lulu, Stories To Tell books)
- Video (reel Genie)
- Get Creative! (Heritage Cookbooks, Photo books, DIY gifts)
Privacy issues: oral history and family stories
- Published or private
- Document the process
- Tips on preserving stories and protecting privacy
Ensuring your family's legacy
- Data backup basics
- Future proofing your data
- Keep the legacy train moving forward
- Tips and tricks for oral history preservation
On being the family story keeper
- Technology and story keeping
- Family storytelling: a journey of discovery
- The time is now
Conclusion
Resource list
- Getting started: a checklist for family oral history preservation
- A review of oral history recording tools
- Interviewing family members
- Organising and producing your family's story
- Incorporating existing content
- Modern methods for oral history preservation and sharing
- Privacy issues, oral history and family stories
- Ensuring your family's legacy

Pages: 36

Price:7.00




Researching in German Civil and Church Records

Researching in German Civil and Church Records

Ref: UTP0202

'Researching in German civil and church records' answers the question 'How can I obtain a birth or marriage certificate from Germany for an immigrant ancestor?' What the new researcher may not realise is that in Germany the system of births, marriage and deaths by civil authorities, and the issue of associated certificates, has some significant differences to the system that the researcher may be used to.

Prior to the introduction of civil registration, churches kept registers of baptisms, marriages and burials, and such church records may allow the researcher to follow the family back for several hundred years.

This book is a practical guide that, with the aid of many illustrations, will allow the reader to become familiar with the types of information available on German civil certificates of birth, marriage and death and church records of baptism, marriage and burial. The book then explains how to access these records and build on the information given in the companion volume 'Locating your German ancestor's place of origin'.

Contents:
Introduction
- Background
Civil registration of births, marriages and deaths
- Background to civil records
- Identifying the appropriate 'Standesamt'
- Civil registration certificates
- Obtaining the certificate
Church records of baptsms, marriages and burials
- Background to the German religious scene
- Identifying the appropriate parish
- Church registers (Baptism records, Marriage records, Burial records, Confirmation)
- Family registers
- Accessing the church registers
An introduction to German handwriting
- Confusing letters
Conclusion
Bibliography
- Websites
- Books
Appendix: Keywords found in civil and church records
Index

Pages: 44

Price:7.00







Customer Reviews

    Well illustrated and concise  (16/10/2016) Mrs J Towey -


Scotlands People: the place to launch your Scottish research

Scotlands People: the place to launch your Scottish research

Ref: UTP0104-A


ScotlandsPeople provides an exceptional source of genealogical records for those with Scottish ancestry, Statutory registers of birth, death and marriage, Old parish registers, Catholic parish registers, census records, valuation rolls, wills and testaments, and Coats of Arms. Access to such a wide range of basic records for a relatively cheap fee means we can all research from our home without the expense of hiring a search agent, ordering in many microfilms or a trip to Scotland as pleasant as the last option may be.

With some knowledge and practice you will become adept at locating records of relevance to your family and you will be well on your way with your research. Of course, not all records are available online. You will still need to track down your non-conformists, investigate land records, cemeteries, electoral rolls, directories, poor law, military and other records but ScotlandsPeople is a great place to launch the study of your families.

Pages: 32

Price:5.00







Customer Reviews

    My Scottish research is a bit of a blurr, this will help me look in the right direction on my mum's side of the family.  (17/03/2017) Miss J M Holmes -


So You Are Totally New to Family Tree Maker

So You Are Totally New to Family Tree Maker

Ref: UTP0371

Family Tree Maker, usually called FTM, is Uk’s largest selling genealogy program. It has enjoyed huge success and is now in its 22nd iteration as FTM 2014. In December 2013 Ancestry.com announced Family Tree Maker Mac 3 which was released in March 2014.

The program has developed extensively and since purchased by Ancestry.com in 2004 it has become even more tightly integrated with the Ancestry.com database. It has also become very internet aware with its use of Bing Maps and the ability to link to internet sites like Trove from within the program as well using a very convenient web clipping and merging capability.

The program is sold in retail packs that include access to Ancestry.com (or Ancestry.co.uk) paid databases.

This book is intended to be the first of a series about Family Tree Maker, and covers the absolute basics that new users, with very little computer understanding can use to get up and running.

The book takes new users through installation, registration, activating an Ancestry.com subscription, followed by an introduction to creating or importing files. It then introduces the eight workspaces within the program with enough simple explanation to start using it.

Extensive use is made of screen shots to assist the user to understand what he or she is seeing on the screen.

Pages: 52

Price:6.00




Solving Riddles in 19th Century Photo Albums

Solving Riddles in 19th Century Photo Albums

Ref: UTP0241

Many people mistakenly think that the photography process has been around for a very long time. This is of course untrue and indeed the pictures in your heirloom photo album are unlikely to predate the 1860s.
Photographs came in many forms in the nineteenth century and this book assists the reader to identify each type, as this is an essential dating indicator. The booklet then addresses in great detail the other characteristics of photographs with examples to assist the reader in dating the item - the mount itself, the material printed on the back of the photograph, the composition of the photograph including the pose of people depicted and the clothes being worn by the people depicted.
This booklet also addresses the issues related to preserving your photographs for the enjoyment of future generations.
Now updated and retitled, this book was previously issued with the title "Identifying and Dating 19th Century Family Photographs".

Contents:
Introduction
Conservation and preservation of family photos
Archival albums
The history of photography
Photo analysis and checklist
Dating the photograph
5 steps in dating a photograph
Calotypes and daguerreotypes
Ambrotypes
Tintypes 1853-1940
Albumen prints
Dress for special functions
Stereoscopoc photographs
Roll-film prints and the end of an era

Pages: 44

Price:8.50




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The Ones That Got Away: Tracing Elusive Ancestors Who Move Into, Out From and Whithin Britain

The Ones That Got Away: Tracing Elusive Ancestors Who Move Into, Out From and Whithin Britain

Ref: UTP0262

Sooner or later, all genealogists encounter elusive family members: those who appear as if from nowhere; those who disappear without trace and those who vanish for a long period, only to re-emerge later. Ancestors who lurk, parentless, in the top branches of our family tree, or who are apparently still alive at the age of one hundred and sixty are likely to be migrants.
This book describes many research paths that you can follow and sources that you can consult, in your quest for that migrant ancestor. If you are successful, you will have found a new piece of the puzzle that is your family's history. Unfortunately, there is no 'magic wand' but adopting a problem-solving approach and following the many suggestions in this book, may help to break down the brick walls that mobile ancestors often leave in their wake.
Although it involves work, seeking out migrant ancestors is worthwhile; they often have the most interesting stories to uncover. In this volume, you will find advice for locating missing vital records for British family members and advice for those seeking immigrant and emigrant ancestors. There are also lists of useful books and websites for those who need more detail.
If, having exhausted all the suggestions in this book, your ancestor remains stubbornly elusive, you can at least be rest assured that you have tried everything that you can to find him.

Contents:
1. Getting Started
- Introduction
- Who did people move?
- Investigating migrants
2. Finding Vital Records
- Missing marriages
- Marriage records
- Missing births or baptisms
- Alternative sources of information
- Missing deaths or burials
- Warning
3. Employment Related Moves
- Mobile occupations
- Other employment related moves
- Employment records
4. Suggestions for Locating Elusive Ancestors
- Explore the extended family
- Explore the name
- Tracing those whose moves were enforced
- Press the restart button
- Explore the area
5. Moving In
- Waves of immigration
- Finding the origins of immigrants
- Why move in
- Records of immigrants
6. Moving out
- Reasons for emigration
- Records of emigration found in the United Kingdom
- Overseas records
- Final word
Further Reading
Some Useful Websites
Index

Pages: 36

Price:6.00







Customer Reviews

  the ones that got away  Not really helped me find my lost family. I was very pleased with the fast delivery service.  (16/11/2017) nadia davies - stafford


    another useful aid. Easy to read  (10/09/2017) Brian Gilpin -


The War to End War: Tracing Your Great War Australian Military Ancestors

The War to End War: Tracing Your Great War Australian Military Ancestors

Ref: UTP0524

In recent years there has been a substantial increase in the amount of official and individual attention given to Australian military history. There are many reasons for this: the electronic media; more easily accessible records, and the commemoration of World War One have all played their part. The thirst for a greater knowledge of Australia's military history and especially those involved is nowhere more marked than among the nation's genealogists.
This concise, yet comprehensive guide is made to help the family historian embark on the search for Australian military ancestors in World War I, as well as giving you a simple overview of Australia's military history.
After spending over 20 years in the military, Lieutenant Colonel Neil Smith now focuses his time on military history. In this guide book he provides handy outlines of the progress of the war with emphasis placed on the part played by Australia. Armed with this essential knowledge the reader is then shown where to look and how to interpret all available personal war-like records. For those seeking out their Australian military ancestors in World War I, there is no better place to start.

Contents:
Introduction
Getting started
Time line
An inevitable war
The battle lines are drawn
The other fronts
The sea war
War in the clouds
The mincing machine
The final offensives
Australia's Digger army
Outline structure for an Australian Army 1915
Finding your Digger
The essential dossier
A matelot in the family
War records
Under friendly flags
Where to look on the Web
Glossary of terms
Index

Pages: 68

Price:8.50




Til Death Us Do Part: Causes of Death 1300-1948

Til Death Us Do Part: Causes of Death 1300-1948

Ref: UTP0261

The diseases and accidents of our ancestors are an integral part of our family history, and one thing that all but our most recent ancestors have in common, is that they are dead.

This booklet examines a wide variety of possible causes of death for our ancestors, describing their symptoms and prognoses. It also suggests records that may be used to provide information about how an ancestor died.

You'll find a timeline is included which outlines some major British epidemics. In the absence of a definite cause of death for a particular individual, we can at least gain an impression of the major killers of their time.

We owe it to our ancestors to pay tribute not just to their lives, but also to their deaths.

Contents:
Introduction
Epidemics and infections
Work related diseases
The effects of urbanisation
The effects of poverty
Childbirth
Surgery
Famine
War
Suicide, murder and accident
Why did things change?
Finding causes of death
Further reading
Some British epidemics
Index

Pages: 28

Price:5.00




Treasures in Australian Government Gazettes

Treasures in Australian Government Gazettes

Ref: UTP0105

It is true that birth, death and marriage records, wills, cemetery records, newspapers and a range of other resources are likely to tempt family historians with the wealth of details they can provide about our families.
However, how often do we think of turning to the gazettes produced by the government - the education, police and government gazettes - to extend what we know about them? The likely response to any suggestion that it is worth investing time and effort into these records is that they are boring and only cover people who worked for hte government so why bother.
But as the author illustrates with many examples in this book, that idea is far from the truth. Many ordinary people are mentioned, often with details that you will find nowhere else. Digitisation of many years of Australian government, police and educations gazettes now means that such a search is no longer a tedious matter, bu can return many treasures in just a matter of minutes.
We dismiss the gazettes as being irrelevant at our own peril. They cover the whole population - not just government employees, criminals and teachers. They are bound to include someone in your family!

Contents:
Introduction
Government gazettes
- Background
- Records covered
- Availability
Police gazettes
- Background
- Records covered
- Availability
Education gazettes
- Background
- Records covered
- Availability
Bibliography
- Articles
- Books
- Online
Index

Pages: 28

Price:5.50




Trove, Discover Genealogy Treasure in the National Library of Australia

Trove, Discover Genealogy Treasure in the National Library of Australia

Ref: UTP0007

From the author:

As a regular presenter at genealogy expos and seminars I am constantly surprised by the number of people who don’t know, or are not aware of, all of the genealogy resources available on the National Library of Australia website. Trove is the catchy name of the Library’s discovery service into its many collections but it is only one of a number of resources available for research.

While people may be aware of Trove, they are not aware of how to effectively use the various filters to narrow down their searches to maximum advantage. Features such as comments, lists, tagging or correcting text are other areas that many have not yet explored and there are always a few who put up their hand and say they haven’t got an eResources card.

There are other features such as 'Ask a librarian' and 'Cite This' that I am fond of but many in the audience haven’t discovered them yet or realised how these features can assist their research.

This guide outlines why I’m a huge Trove fan. It lists and explains the various features so that other family historians and genealogists can make maximum use of this fantastic free resource. Follow the tips and you will soon become another Trove fan!

Pages: 39

Price:6.00




What Was the Voyage Really Like? A Brief Guide to Researching Convict & Immigrant Voyages to Australia & New Zealand

What Was the Voyage Really Like? A Brief Guide to Researching Convict & Immigrant Voyages to Australia & New Zealand

Ref: UTP0002

Discovering when and how an ancestor arrived in Australia is the ambition of every family historian. In the majority of instances it is now relatively simple, as archives have been indexing passenger lists over the last few decades and many have put those indexes up on their websites and made them freely available.
Many of us wonder what the actual voyage was like and there are numerous resources that can be used to compile a detailed account of the voyage and what our ancestors would have experienced during the trip. Passenger lists outline who was on the ship - how many people and how many births and deaths occurred on board. There may also be health officer's reports and other ship reports to be found in the Colonial Secretary's correspondence in the various state archives.
Newspapers can also provide information on the immigrants and the voyage and in earlier days may have included details of passengers. Perhaps the best source of all is a shipboard log or diary written by your own ancestor, but if you are not that lucky, then other passengers' diaries may be useful in providing details of what happened during the voyage.
Written as an expanded version of a talk that the author gives, this is an excellent up-to-date guide on the topic of researching "Convict and Immigrant Voyages to Australia and New Zealand". First released in 2010, this second edition has been revised and updated.

Contents:
Abbreviations
Preface
Introduction
Why did our ancestors come to Australia?
- Convicts
- Immigrants
- Twentieth century immigration
What ship did they arrive on?
- Convict lists
- Immigrant passenger lists
- Twentieth century immigration
What did the ship look like?
What was the voyage like?
- Published sources - convicts
- Published sources - immigrants
- Original records - immigrants
How to find shipboard diaries and logs
- Convicts
- Immigrants
- New discoveries
What happened after arrival?
What about maritime and migration museums?
What about shipwrecks?
What happened to the ships?
Conclusion
Select bibliography
Index

Pages: 44

Price:6.50







Customer Reviews

    Just what I expected and good value  (10/09/2017) Brian Gilpin -


Where Do I Start? A Brief Guide to Researching your Family History in Australia and New Zealand

Where Do I Start? A Brief Guide to Researching your Family History in Australia and New Zealand

Ref: UTP0010

Where do I start? is perhaps one of the most frequently asked questions from people interested in learning more about their family history. The author, Shauna Hicks decided to write this research guide to present together in one place methodology and resources that she mentioned in her presentations to societies and libraries.
Using various internet resources you can usually built a family pedigree quickly going back several generations. Then you confirm what you discovered and spend more time filling in the details and getting to know your ancestors lives and the communities in which they lived.
It is definitely not all online and this guide highlights some of the archives and libraries that you will become familiar with as you research your family history.
As a beginner's guide it has been hard to keep it simple as there are just so many resources that can be used for genealogy and family history. While Shauna has tried not to overwhelm those just starting out, she has also tried to make people aware that there are many ways to research and record your family history.
It is a learning process and you will acquire new skills and knowledge as you progress. This book is the first step to discovering your family history.

Contents:
Abbreviations
Preface
Select timeline
Introduction
Week 1 Look for home sources and stay tuned
Week 2 Build strong foundations - certificates, history and geography
Week 3 Has your family been researched by othrs?
Week 4 Flesh out the family using archives
Week 5 Flesh out the family using libraries
Week 6 Get help from genealogy and family history societies
Week 7 Discover more family stories
Week 8 Use social media to discover more relatives
Week 9 Write your family stories and learn more
Week 10 Overseas research
Conclusion
Bibliography
Index

Pages: 72

Price:8.50




Your Family History Archives: A Brief Introduction

Your Family History Archives: A Brief Introduction

Ref: UTP0001

Your Family History Archives' is a brief introduction to the basics of recording, organising and caring for family archives and what to do to ensure the collection is not lost to future generations of family and other researchers. It is based on a talk that the author presents to genealogy and family history groups.
As a professional historian, archivist, librarian and family historian, the author was aware of the lack of information in this area to assist other family historians to organise and look after their family archives.
A family archive does not eventuate overnight, it slowly grows over the years. The first section of this book encompasses collection, organising and accessing your family records and memorabilia. The second stage is the conservation and preservation process to ensure that they are kept for future generations. The final stage is what happens to the collection in the future.

Contents:
Preface
Abbreviations
Part 1 - What are Family History Archives?
- Family History and Archives and Recordkeeping
- Organising the Family Archives
Part 2 - Caring For Your Family Archives
- Storage
- Preservation and Conservation
- Disaster Planning
Part 3 - Future Preservation of Your Family Archives
- Writing, Publishing and Sharing
- Who Inherits the Family Archives?
Conclusion
Appendix 1. List of Archival Suppliers
Appendix 2. List of Conservators
Appendix 3. RMAA Personal Continuity Plan
Select Bibliography

Pages: 40

Price:5.50




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